Archive for the ‘Animation’ Category

‪Fotographical Friday: Left-facing Faces Week: The Tick band-aids 

April 7, 2017

Fotographical Friday – Animal Week: Moose (sans squirrel)

March 17, 2017

FF – Fotographical Friday: I yam what I yam. 

August 12, 2016

“A-gah-gah-gah!”
  

Memories. 

June 30, 2016

Sometimes Facebook memories will be something you’d like to forget, with a teeny bit of something you’d like to remember. Three years ago I hurt my thumb really bad (and really stupidly) but…dig my boss bandaids! 
  

Apocalypse averted

July 9, 2014

An animated classic from my childhood almost got Carey-ed away.

Comics go to the movies – TV specials

January 11, 2012

The AV Club has a nice write-up on comic strips that were turned into obscure TV specials.

Certainly the most interesting, yet not very succesful, is the pilot for a Wizard of Id series done not in animation, not with human actors, but with Muppets. I got to see this over a decade ago at a Johnny Hart exhibit in Binghamton NY. Johnny himself was our guide and said the coming of Sesame Street stopped the process from going further.

The one that you’d think would be the hardest to adapt – The Far Side – because of its lack of characters and plot, is the best of the ones I’ve seen. Surreally fun. (I still have it on ye ol’ video tape from when it first appeared on TV.)

They don’t give  much love to the Cathy special. But take a look at the clip there. I happen to think it’s well written and acted. Take that, h8trs.

I wouldn’t normally suggest that anyone read the comments on the AV Club – they often have little to do with the subject and are just people wanting to hear themselves talk (or, type). This time there are some interesting tidbits in the discussions as well as links to other clips. I think one of them was a Slovenia-produced Hagar the Horrible.

And now for something (somewhat) completely different…

August 14, 2011

 

I grew up on Monty Python. When it first started being shown on our local PBS station in the early 70s I was in junior high. The people who “got it” were my friends and it shaped our newly budding senses of humor. Here’s a video clip (via Daily Cartoonist) from back in the day of animator Terry Gilliam explaining how he does what he does (or, did). And he shows how he created the rightly-famous carnivorous baby carriage cartoon from above.

I don’t normally link to stuff like this, but it was so exiting to see that if I had seen it back in the day, my teenage head would have exploded with joy.

(Back in the day. There, I just wanted to type it a third time.)

Summer T-shirt Spectacular!! Part 1

June 1, 2011

Yep, it’s summer – the prime t-shirt wearing time of year. I am a cartoonist, and in many ways a cartoon geek, but not the kind of geek that wears a lot of cartoon t-shirts.

Or am I?

Today I put on the above t-shirt so I thought I’d post my shirt every time it’s a cartoon one (at least until they start repeating) and try to explain my way out of it so as not to look like as big a dork as fear I might be.

This is obviously an Underdog shirt. I watched the cartoon as a kid but was never a big fan (although Wally Cox as the voice of Underdog was a big plus). I like mottled gray shirts, I liked the design and its hipster pre-distressed look. And I like that it was $5 at my favorite store, Five Below.

To be completely vain about it, the coolness factor for a cartoon shirt is in reverse proportion to the popularity of the character. Underdog is a lot less popular than, say, Wolverine, so I probably wouldn’t wear a Wolverine shirt.

(Underdog also had a cool theme song, made even cooler in this version by the Butthole Surfers.)

Music with art

April 8, 2011

Just got home from doing a wee bit of a talk about art, cartooning and meaning as a lead-in to the “music with art” piece Twilight of the Gods (music by Andrew Boysen, Jr, art by Erik A. Evensen) at the Majestic Theater in Gettysburg PA. (You can check it out at Evensen site.) I spoke on the validity of comics/cartoons presenting serious subjects like this – a retelling of a Scandinavian myth about the apocalypse. (And you’re not going to get any more serious than the apocalypse.)

Here’s part of my shtick:

“The thing to remember is that comics is a medium, merely a way to get a story or idea across, same as a book, or theater, or movies. We don’t think of all movies as being about masked killers who hunt unfortunate teenagers on the night of their prom. That’s a horror movie. That’s a genre. We accept film as being a flexible enough form to contain a heartfelt drama about a young woman coming of age during the depression whose entire family is wiped out by a unknown and incurable disease but heroically faces adversity to live an enriching, inspiring life. Or a comedy about a police officer who puts on a fat suit to pose as very, very large woman which, somehow, helps him to fight crime.”

Simpons reference alert

June 20, 2010

We were offered a “Baby on Board” sign by a friend. We turned it down, but I was think we should have accepted only so I add to it, in Sharpie, “something, something, Burt Ward.”